Law

California Financing Law | The Department of Business Oversight

Responsible Small Dollar Loans Pilot Program

Senate Bill 318 (Chap. 467, Stats. 2013) was signed into law on October 1, 2013 and is operative January 1, 2014. The bill created the Pilot Program for Increased Access to Responsible Small Dollar Loans (RSDL) to increase the availability of responsible small dollar installment loans of at least $300 but less than $2,500. Finance lenders who are licensed underthe CFLL and approved by the Commissioner of Business Oversight (Commissioner) to participate in the program may charge specified alternative interest rates and charges, including an administrative fee and delinquency fees, on loans of at least $300 but less than $2,500, subject to certain requirements. Licensees participating in the program are also permitted to use the services of a finder as defined in Section 22371 of the Financial Code.

Licensees under the former pilot program for affordable credit-building opportunities:

Effective January 1, 2014, Senate Bill

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Injury Law | Justia

Personal injury law is an area of civil law concerned with providing monetary compensation to victims of accidents or social wrongs. The injured person bringing the lawsuit is called the “plaintiff,” and the person or entity allegedly responsible for the injury is called the “defendant.” In fatal accidents, the family of the decedent may bring a wrongful death suit against the person or entity responsible for the accident.

In some cases, there may be multiple responsible parties, and the plaintiff may be able to sue all of them to recover the full amount of compensation needed for his or her injuries. The defendant in turn may allege that another person or entity was responsible and bring that person or entity into the lawsuit as a cross-defendant.

The burden of proof in personal injury cases is typically lower than the burden of proof for criminal cases arising out of the same

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Rule 602. Need for Personal Knowledge | Federal Rules of Evidence | US Law

A witness may testify to a matter only if evidence is introduced sufficient to support a finding that the witness has personal knowledge of the matter. Evidence to prove personal knowledge may consist of the witness’s own testimony. This rule does not apply to a witness’s expert testimony under Rule 703.

Notes

(Pub. L. 93–595, §1, Jan. 2, 1975, 88 Stat. 1934; Mar. 2, 1987, eff. Oct. 1, 1987; Apr. 25, 1988, eff. Nov. 1, 1988; Apr. 26, 2011, eff. Dec. 1, 2011.)

Notes of Advisory Committee on Proposed Rules

“* * * [T]he rule requiring that a witness who testifies to a fact which can be perceived by the senses must have had an opportunity to observe, and must have actually observed the fact” is a “most pervasive manifestation” of the common law insistence upon “the most reliable sources of information.” McCormick §10, p. 19. These foundation requirements may,

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Personal Information | Wex | US Law

right of privacy: access to personal information

The right of privacy has evolved to protect the ability of individuals to determine what sort of information about themselves is collected, and how that information is used. Most commercial websites utilize “cookies,” as well as forms, to collect information from visitors such as name, address, email, demographic info, social security number, IP address, and financial information. In many cases, this information is then provided to third parties for marketing purposes. Other entities, such as the federal government and financial institutions, also collect personal information. The threats of fraud and identity theft created by this flow of personal information have been an impetus for right of privacy legislation requiring disclosure of information collection practices, opt-out opportunities, as well as internal protections of collected information. However, such requirements have yet to reach all segments of the marketplace.

15 U.S.C. § 45 charges the Federal

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Personal Jurisdiction | Wex | US Law

Overview

Personal jurisdiction refers to the power that a court has to make a decision regarding the party being sued in a case. Before a court can exercise power over a party, the U.S. Constitution requires that the party has certain minimum contacts with the forum in which the court sits.  International Shoe v Washington, 326 US 310 (1945). So if the plaintiff sues a defendant, that defendant can object to the suit by arguing that the court does not have personal jurisdiction over the defendant.

Waiving Personal Jurisdiction

Personal jurisdiction can generally be waived (contrast this with Subject Matter Jurisdiction, which cannot be waived), so if the party being sued appears in a court without objecting to the court’s lack of personal jurisdiction over it, then the court will assume that the defendant is waiving any challenge to personal jurisdiction.  See Federal Rule of Civil Procedure 12(b)(2). 

Obtaining Personal

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2 Law School Personal Statements That Succeeded | Top Law Schools

Deciding what to say in the law school personal statement is the most challenging part of the admissions process for some applicants.

“Even people who are good writers often have a hard time writing about themselves,” says Jessica Pishko, a former admissions consultant and writing tutor at Accepted, a Los Angeles-based admissions consulting firm. “That is perfectly normal.”

Pishko, who coached law school applicants on how to overcome writer’s block, says, “If you can find the thing that you really care about, that is who you are, and talking about that is a great way to write about yourself.”

Why Law Schools Ask for Personal Statements

Personal statements can offer J.D. admissions committees “a narrative” about the applicant, which is important because it is rare for law schools to conduct admissions interviews, says Christine Carr, a law school admissions consultant with Accepted who previously was an associate director of admissions

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Law School Personal Statement Tips

In your personal statement for law school you want to present yourself as intelligent, professional, mature and persuasive. These are the qualities that make a good lawyer, so they’re the qualities that law schools seek in applicants.

Your grades and LSAT score are the most important part of your application to law school. But you shouldn’t neglect the law school personal statement. Your application essay is a valuable opportunity to distinguish yourself from other applicants, especially those with similar LSAT scores and GPA.

law school personal statement

How To Write a Personal Statement for Law School

1. Be specific to each law school.

You’ll probably need to write only one basic personal statement, but you should tweak it for each law school to which you apply. There are usually some subtle differences in what each school asks for in a personal statement.

2. Good writing is writing that is easily

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Insurance | Wex | US Law

Definition

A contract in which one party agrees to indemnify another against a predefined category of risks in exchange for a premium.  Depending on the contract, the insurer may promise to financially protect the insured from the loss, damage, or liability stemming from some event.  An insurance contract will almost always limit the amount of monetary protection possible.

Overview

In the absence of insurance, three possible individuals bear the burden of an economic loss; the individual suffering the loss; the individual causing the loss via negligence or unlawful conduct; or lastly, a particular party who has been allocated the burden by the legislature, such as employers under Workmen’s Compensation statutes.

While types of insurance vary widely, their primary goal is to allocate the risks of a loss from the individual to a great number of people. Each individual pays a “premium” into a pool, from which losses are paid out.

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Small Business Law – FindLaw

Starting and running a small business requires a very broad skill set and nerves of steel. It’s not for everyone, and even successful entrepreneurs encounter failure from time to time. In order to help you stay ahead of the curve, FindLaw’s Small Business Law section covers everything from obtaining financing and hiring employees, to choosing the right insurance policies and filing taxes. Those who operate small businesses typically wear many different hats, but also must know when and how to seek help from others.

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